Chapter Forty-three | Plainfield Christian Science Church, Independent

Chapter Forty-three

From Mary Baker Eddy, Her Spiritual Footsteps by


Handling Mesmerism of False Laws

What did Mrs. Eddy mean, when she said to her students at Pleasant View, “There are a few laws to be broken, then we will be free”? Is this consistent with the conception of the work of the Christian Scientist as set forth in Science and Health?

When the student contemplates effect, or the outward evidence of the material senses, he is apt to become discouraged by the multiplicity of what his scientific demonstration must include, before he can gain his freedom. When he contemplates cause, however, he recognizes that there are only a few laws, so-called, which must be broken, in order for man to gain his freedom; and, through the breaking of these few laws relating to cause, effect will be rectified in all its ramifications, which seem so complicated, just as a large picture shown on a screen is brought into sharp focus, with all its numberless details, just by turning a tiny thumbscrew that regulates the position of the lenses.

The first false law to be handled, is the mesmerism relating to a false sense of God, or Mind, which looms up as a mortal mind cause, seeming real. Next in order, must be handled the mesmerism relating to our own thinking, and our own capacity to be hypnotized; for a proper effort in this direction obliterates the belief in a power apart from God, and our own capacity to be influenced by such a belief, or false mind. Finally comes the so-called law relating to the error that sees all mankind mesmerized, with their thinking manipulated, because they are susceptible to this mesmerism. The breaking of these few laws represents the work necessary, in order to bring the whole picture of God’s perfect universe back into its right focus, so that we shall be free from this distortion which we call the material world.

This unfoldment is based on the fact, that the error in creation is not in what we see, but in the way we see it. This circumstance would hold true of a man wearing blue glasses. The trouble lies not with the landscape, but with that which he is looking through. Just a little correction will bring the whole landscape back in its normal beauty to his eyes.




Print this page


Share via email